Tra i tanti motivi per cui non usare Facebook per le comunicazioni personali

C’è anche questa bella novità:

Facebook found a new place to sell video ads: Inside Messenger, where some users will start to see autoplay video ads appear in their inbox right next to messages from friends and family. [link]

È da tempo che ogni volta che vedo che qualcuno a me vicino intrattenere comunicazioni importanti (di qualsiasi tipo: d’amore, di lavoro, d’affetti) attraverso Facebook, mi parte il rantolo sulla privacy: ma temo che non serva. Né il rantolo, né, a conti fatti, neanche questo post.

WhatsApp founder plans to leave after broad clashes with parent Facebook

WhatsApp founder plans to leave after broad clashes with parent Facebook

Jan Koum ha deciso di dimettersi dalla sua carica di CEO di WhatsApp.

Brian Acton, suo socio cofondatore si era già dimesso a Novembre.

Alla base della decisione ci sarebbe il disaccordo di Koum per le politiche di Facebook sul trattamento dei dati personali degli utenti e la disattenzione verso le tematiche della crittografia e della sicurezza delle comunicazioni.

“It is time for me to move on”

Beyond Cambridge Analytica

Beyond Cambridge Analytica

Una società italiana, la Area, ha venduto un software per monitoraggio del traffico in Rete al regime siriano di Bashar Al-Assad.

Ora pubblicizza uno spyware che consente il monitoraggio e la manipolazione delle informazioni sui social media.

Palantir, Cambridge Analytica, Facebook

Palantir, Cambridge Analytica, Facebook

It was a Palantir employee in London, working closely with the data scientists building Cambridge’s psychological profiling technology, who suggested the scientists create their own app — a mobile-phone-based personality quiz — to gain access to Facebook users’ friend networks, according to documents obtained by The New York Times.

Qui a No Rocket Science non abbiamo tanta passione per Peter Thiel, come si ricorderanno i lettori più affezionati. Onestamente però non stupisce che un dipendente della sua società abbia dato l’idea a Cambridge Analytica di usare delle ingenuità1Ingenuità un cazzo, ma lasciamo perdere. nella struttura di Facebook, né convince la smentita secondo la quale è stata un’iniziativa personale e che loro non c’entran niente:

“There were senior Palantir employees that were also working on the Facebook data,” said Christopher Wylie, a data expert and Cambridge Analytica co-founder, in testimony before British lawmakers on Tuesday.

What the F*** Was Facebook Thinking?

What the F*** Was Facebook Thinking?

Serve tradurre?

There’s a very good reason that Facebook is the fastest growing advertising business in the world. It’s because it has the largest, most detailed and most granular user data on the planet. It’s also incredibly personal, and will reveal a lot about your life to anyone who has access to it. And yet all the way up until April 2015, Facebook was giving all that data away to its developers that were using the Graph API.

I profili coinvolti nel caso Cambridge Analytica sono un po’ più di 50 milioni

I profili coinvolti nel caso Cambridge Analytica sono un po’ più di 50 milioni

Facebook ha annunciato che i profili coinvolti sono quasi il doppio. In più, Zuckerberg ha ammesso che prima o poi tutti gli utenti del servizio hanno avuto il profilo scandagliato da qualche app di terze parti, che ha acquisito quanti più dati possibile su di loro:

Facebook said Wednesday that “malicious actors” took advantage of search tools on its platform, making it possible for them to discover the identities and collect information on most of its 2 billion users worldwide.

The revelation came amid rising acknowledgement by Facebook about its struggles to control the data it gathers on users. Among the announcements Wednesday was that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy hired by President Trump and other Republicans, had improperly gathered detailed Facebook information on 87 million people, of whom 71 million were Americans.

Facebook continua a fare le stesse promesse

Facebook continua a fare le stesse promesse

E praticamente con le stesse parole, sempre, ha fatto notare CBS.

Facebook on Wednesday attempted to make amends for having utilized data from tens millions of profiles without consent from users. The social media giant formally announced changes it claims will make it easier for users to control what they share in a post titled “It’s Time to Make Our Privacy Tools Easier to Find.”

The release, authored by Facebook’s Chief Privacy Officer Erin Egan and Deputy General Counsel Ashlie Beringer, touts improved functionality and design of individual privacy settings on the platform. But that is something it’s been promising since 2006. The release employed stock language that Facebook has trotted out repeatedly when faced with questions over how it handles user data and privacy.

Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is leaving Facebook

Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is leaving Facebook

The 24-year-old Luckey became a controversial figure after he reluctantly admitted to helping fund an internet trolling group supporting Donald Trump. Luckey apologized and has remained largely out of sight since then, although he testified in a lawsuit against Oculus by gaming company ZeniMax, which won a $50 million judgment against him. It’s unclear what Luckey’s role has been since Oculus reorganized late last year, but Oculus and Facebook insisted that Luckey was still with the company at that time. More recently, fellow co-founder Brendan Iribe said Luckey was “still working in an active capacity” on his team at Oculus. Apparently, that’s no longer true.

Snapchat is becoming a search engine

Snapchat is becoming a search engine

Facebook has spent the better part of a year copying key aspects of Snapchat’s products; now it seems Snapchat is returning the favor. The “camera company” announced today that it is revamping the way users search for Stories—the daily photos and videos that people and brands post to their accounts—as well as opening up a new advertising revenue stream.

Facebook Pins a Scarlet Letter to Fake News

Facebook Pins a Scarlet Letter to Fake News

A process to tag fake news with a warning label. Facebook has made arrangements with a network of fact-checking organizations. The organizations will vet stories that surface through user reports and indications that Facebook’s algorithm will sniff out. If the organizations — which themselves are identified by the non-profit Poynter Institute as signatories of its International Fact Checking Code of Principles — dispute the claims in the story, Facebook will label it as “disputed,” and put a “flag” on it that links to the fact checker’s explanation. The fact checkers involved in this initial part of the program are Snopes, Politifact, Factcheck.org, and ABC News’ fact-checking initiative. Mosseri says those organizations are taking on this task as part of their mission, and Facebook isn’t paying them.

About time. (This article is by Steven Levy, so read it all, it’s worth it.)