Facebook continua a fare le stesse promesse

Facebook continua a fare le stesse promesse

E praticamente con le stesse parole, sempre, ha fatto notare CBS.

Facebook on Wednesday attempted to make amends for having utilized data from tens millions of profiles without consent from users. The social media giant formally announced changes it claims will make it easier for users to control what they share in a post titled “It’s Time to Make Our Privacy Tools Easier to Find.”

The release, authored by Facebook’s Chief Privacy Officer Erin Egan and Deputy General Counsel Ashlie Beringer, touts improved functionality and design of individual privacy settings on the platform. But that is something it’s been promising since 2006. The release employed stock language that Facebook has trotted out repeatedly when faced with questions over how it handles user data and privacy.

Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is leaving Facebook

Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is leaving Facebook

The 24-year-old Luckey became a controversial figure after he reluctantly admitted to helping fund an internet trolling group supporting Donald Trump. Luckey apologized and has remained largely out of sight since then, although he testified in a lawsuit against Oculus by gaming company ZeniMax, which won a $50 million judgment against him. It’s unclear what Luckey’s role has been since Oculus reorganized late last year, but Oculus and Facebook insisted that Luckey was still with the company at that time. More recently, fellow co-founder Brendan Iribe said Luckey was “still working in an active capacity” on his team at Oculus. Apparently, that’s no longer true.

Snapchat is becoming a search engine

Snapchat is becoming a search engine

Facebook has spent the better part of a year copying key aspects of Snapchat’s products; now it seems Snapchat is returning the favor. The “camera company” announced today that it is revamping the way users search for Stories—the daily photos and videos that people and brands post to their accounts—as well as opening up a new advertising revenue stream.

Facebook Pins a Scarlet Letter to Fake News

Facebook Pins a Scarlet Letter to Fake News

A process to tag fake news with a warning label. Facebook has made arrangements with a network of fact-checking organizations. The organizations will vet stories that surface through user reports and indications that Facebook’s algorithm will sniff out. If the organizations — which themselves are identified by the non-profit Poynter Institute as signatories of its International Fact Checking Code of Principles — dispute the claims in the story, Facebook will label it as “disputed,” and put a “flag” on it that links to the fact checker’s explanation. The fact checkers involved in this initial part of the program are Snopes, Politifact, Factcheck.org, and ABC News’ fact-checking initiative. Mosseri says those organizations are taking on this task as part of their mission, and Facebook isn’t paying them.

About time. (This article is by Steven Levy, so read it all, it’s worth it.)

Facebook 2026

Facebook 2026

Casey Newton interviewed Mark Zuckerberg and got a view of Facebook’s next ten years. Even if you’re not into the social network ecosystem, there are some pretty interesting things. At least, Mark knows that you have to reinvent yourself and your company to stay alive and competitive:

This is an early milestone, but it’s a big one. It’s not something you necessarily expect Facebook to do, because we’re not an aerospace company. But I guess we’re becoming one.

There are fascinating remarks about artificial intelligence and bots, too:

There’s a lot of debate in society about, “Is AI going to do good or harm?” But I think pattern recognition will be extremely helpful in so many ways, from being able to tell a blind person what is in an image, to being able to read something to someone who is deaf or just can’t turn the volume on on their phone right now. Or, being able to diagnose diseases better, or better identifying drugs that might treat a disease, or drive cars more safely. This stuff is really going to save people’s lives.
It’s important to keep in mind that this isn’t magic, right? It’s math and statistics and pattern recognition and using a lot of data in different data sets. It’s not going to get away from us — it’s all stuff that will just improve people’s lives.

How Mark Zuckerberg led Facebook’s War to Crush Google Plus

How Mark Zuckerberg led Facebook’s War to Crush Google Plus

In Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg built not just a business, but a company culture with the fervor of a messianic sect. So, in June 2011, when Google launched Google Plus, Zuckerberg put his company into lockdown. In an adaption from his new book on Silicon Valley, former Facebook employee Antonio García Martínez describes the war that followed.

Fascinating reading. It seems natural that, although in the real world nobody cared for G+, Facebook was worried.

Facebook is testing multiple, interest-based news feeds

Facebook is testing multiple, interest-based news feeds

“People have told us they’d like new options to see and have conversations about more stories on Facebook around specific topics they’re interested in,” a Facebook spokesperson told The Verge. “So we are testing feeds for people to view different stories from people and Pages based on topic areas.”

This could be very interesting, if the sources for each topic are diverse enough. Otherwise, we fear that it could easily replicate Facebook own flaw: giving the user information and status updates from people that already think like her.